Self-defeating behavior


Self-defeating behavior

As noted in the previous subject, an addiction is any self-defeating behavior that a person cannot stop despite its adverse consequences.  Whenever a crisis, boredom, conflict, or pressure comes around, the addicted person inevitably looks to the substance (or the behavior) for help.  None of this happens as a result of rational thinking, wherein  a person actually decides to do such-and-such because he or she has thought  through the benefits, cost,  and implications of the choice.  Instead, it is a deep-rooted, emotional response, the existence of which will probably be denied, even when it is brought to the person’s attention.

Seen in this way, a person can develop an addictive pattern of living with nearly any activity or object that produces a temporary mood change.  Do you always do the same thing to feel better when you are upset, frightened, hurt, bored, or angered?  This may be an indication that you are caught in an addiction.  In contrast, if you accept your painful emotions and use them to pinpoint a problem (that must be faced by considering a range of constructive options), then you are probably not addicted.

There are an almost endless number of substances, activities, and objects to which we can become addicted.  Some of the more widespread addictions include:

pornography
being responsible
success
work
caffeine
television
religion
relationships
the stock market
flying on commercial airlines
men (or women) who are unavailable
jogging and other forms of exercise
being needed
power
romance
sugar
food
shopping
sports
sex
plastic surgery
rage

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About georgehach

I am a retired Lay Minister, acting as a prophet for God to understand the end times that is comingg and how to prepare for it.
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